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These Lands Are Ours: Tecumseh's Fight For The Old Northwest
These Lands Are Ours: Tecumseh's Fight For The Old Northwest
(Kate Connell, Alex Haley, Jan Naimo Jones)

These Lands Are Ours: Tecumseh's Fight For The Old NorthwestThese Lands Are Ours (October 1992)
These Lands Are Ours discusses the life of the Shawnee warrior, orator and leader who united a confederacy of Indians in order to save Indian land from the advance of white soldiers and settlers.
This biography focuses on Tecumseh's struggle to enlist support from the tribes against the "Long Knives" and to reclaim the American Indian lands lost in the signing of the unfairly negotiated Fort Wayne Treaty. The defeat of Tecumseh's followers in the 1811 Battle of Tippecanoe, and the subsequent destruction of his people's village, Prophetstown, were setbacks from which Tecumseh barely recovered.
Tecumseh was killed while fighting against the Americans in the War of 1812, and with him died his unrealized dream—to unite all American Indian tribes. The afterword explains to young readers the use of dialogue in the biography, and presents the notes documenting details presented in the book.
Kate Connell is a published author of several children's books. Some of her credits include: These Lands Are Ours: Tecumseh's Fight For The Old Northwest (Stories of America), Tales From The Underground Railroad (Stories of America) and Dust Bowl Days: Hard Times for Farmers (Voices from America's Past).
Jan Naimo Jones is a published author and an illustrator of several children's books. Some of her credits include: These Lands Are Ours: Tecumseh's Fight For The Old Northwest (Stories of America), Maker of Machines: A Story About Eli Whitney (Creative Minds Biography) and Grandma, What Is Prayer? (Hardcover Edition)
Alex Haley, as General Editor, wrote the following introduction:
Introduction By Alex Haley, General Editor
Part of my childhood was spent playing "Cowboys and Indians," a game of make-believe based on movies we watched. We would chase each other around whooping and yelling, firing cap pistols or pointed fingers as we yelled "Bang! Your're dead. Bang! Got you!" ("No you didn't," was always the reply.) The Indians were never "us." They were either invisible, ghosts of our imagination, or little kids dragged into the game because we were bigger. No one wanted to be an Indian, everyone wanted to be the hero. That was what we knew then. We knew the movies, not the history.
The war between the American Indian peoples and the white newcomers were longer by far than any other war in our history. It began soon after Jamestown was founded in 1607 and lasted almost into this century, Name it in terms of its length and it could be called "The Three Hundred Years War." Think of it in terms of a people defending their land, homes, and families against terrible odds, and you will discover something else. You will discover many new heroes. Not surprisingly, many of them—like the Apache Geronimo, the Oglala Sioux Crazy Horse, the Seminole Osceola, the Ottawa Pontiac, and the Wampanoag Metacom—were warriors. Others, like the Nez Perce Chief Joseph and the Cherokee Sequoyah, were statesmen. And some, like the Shawnee Tecumseh—the subject of this book—were both. ~ Alex Haley.
(The above Foreword by Alex Haley is presented under the Creative Commons License. © 1993 Dialogue Systems, Inc. All Rights Reserved.)
These Lands Are Ours • Reviews
"These lands are ours; no one has a right to remove us, because we were the first owners." - Tecumseh.
"These Lands Are Ours is a biography for young readers about the Shawnee leader Tecumseh, the warrior and statesman, who devoted his life to his vision of a united American Indian nation." - Anthropology Outreach.
"These Lands Are Ours describes how Tecumseh, leader of the Shawnee, organized and united Native Americans to fight the U.S. government's efforts to dislodge them from their native homes." - Cambium Learning.
"In an effort to keep the United States Government from forcing his people off their lands, the Shawnee leader Tecumseh attempts to create a union of American Indian nations. He is opposed by William Henry Harrison and helped and hampered by his reckless brother, the Prophet." - Horn Book Review.
"Connell discusses the era of the War of 1812 from the Indian perspective tracing the life of Tecumseh who united a confederacy of Indians in an effort to save Indian land from the advance of white soldiers and settlers." - California Online Resources For Education.

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